Bobby Silas

Hopi – Tewa

Born in 1987, Bobby Silas was taught potting by a member of the Navasie family. Bobby has been potting only four years and is intent on reviving Sikyatki pottery using local clay, tools and variations of the ancient designs. Bobby says his focus is to revive the Siktayki pottery of 1100-1600. In the last few years, Bobby has revived the Siktayki method of firing using lignite coal, which he acquires near First Mesa at Hopi. This technique allows the clay to burn at a higher temperature and burn longer. All of his work is hand-coiled, painted with native clay slips, and a bee-weed plant variant. Bobby has made it clear that he is an artist who is drawn to the past and wants to make his pottery same way his ancestors did. He has gone to the museum in Flagstaff and the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe. That gave him access to old pieces of Zuni and Hopi pottery.

Bobby Silas

Hopi – Tewa

Born in 1987, Bobby Silas was taught potting by a member of the Navasie family. Bobby has been potting only four years and is intent on reviving Sikyatki pottery using local clay, tools and variations of the ancient designs. Bobby says his focus is to revive the Siktayki pottery of 1100-1600. In the last few years, Bobby has revived the Siktayki method of firing using lignite coal, which he acquires near First Mesa at Hopi. This technique allows the clay to burn at a higher temperature and burn longer. All of his work is hand-coiled, painted with native clay slips, and a bee-weed plant variant. Bobby has made it clear that he is an artist who is drawn to the past and wants to make his pottery same way his ancestors did. He has gone to the museum in Flagstaff and the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe. That gave him access to old pieces of Zuni and Hopi pottery.

Sold
$900.00
Sold
$900.00