Mark Tahbo

The process of making pottery is a time-honored tradition among the Hopi-Tewa potters of First Mesa, Arizona. The clay is dug from the earth and the impurities are filtered out. Then the bowl is formed in the traditional method of layering coil upon coil. Mark Tahbo does not use any additional clay slip to polish his bowls, but re-wets the body of the piece and then uses a stone to burnish it. This is the process that creates the high shine on his work. Their bowls are fired in a traditional outdoor firing, using sheep manure and old pottery shards as part of the process. Markfs work is deeply influenced by his Hopi-Tewa ancestry. However, he is an individualist artist at heart. Mark has so much creativity and innovative spirit reflected in his art work. He is the great-grandson of noted potter Grace Chapella. Today, they Mark is among the leaders of the Hopi-Tewa potters.

Mark Tahbo

The process of making pottery is a time-honored tradition among the Hopi-Tewa potters of First Mesa, Arizona. The clay is dug from the earth and the impurities are filtered out. Then the bowl is formed in the traditional method of layering coil upon coil. Mark Tahbo does not use any additional clay slip to polish his bowls, but re-wets the body of the piece and then uses a stone to burnish it. This is the process that creates the high shine on his work. Their bowls are fired in a traditional outdoor firing, using sheep manure and old pottery shards as part of the process. Markfs work is deeply influenced by his Hopi-Tewa ancestry. However, he is an individualist artist at heart. Mark has so much creativity and innovative spirit reflected in his art work. He is the great-grandson of noted potter Grace Chapella. Today, they Mark is among the leaders of the Hopi-Tewa potters.

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Hopi/Tewa

Mark Tahbo #5162

$1,500.00